Keynote / Invited Speaker List
 
Indranil Manna

 

 

 

 

Indranil Manna, JC Bose Fellow

Indian Institute of Technology KANPUR, UP, India

Vice President, Indian National Academy of Engineeringand
President, Indian Institute of Metals

 

September 19th 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Tailoring Surface Microstructure by Laser Assisted Surface Engineering for Enhanced Corrosion and Oxidation Resistance in Metallic Alloys

 

Abstract:

Surface microstructure and composition play an important role in determining resistance of metallic systems and components to corrosion and oxidation in aggressive environment. Hence tailoring and protecting the surface in lieu modifying the entire bulk, commonly referred to as surface engineering is a convenient, logical, economical and effective way of enhancing the performance and service life of various engineering components employed in static or dynamic conditions for applications ranging from micro/miniature devices to mega/large machines exposed to aggressive environment for corrosion/erosion at ambient or elevated temperature.

 

Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) offers a non-contact, coherent, monochromatic and directed energy beam of sufficient power density to heat, melt or vaporize almost all solids with unparalleled precision/accuracy that enables tailoring the surface microstructure and/or composition with rare precision, flexibility and novelty.

 

In the present talk, the principle, mechanism and utility of laser assisted surface engineering will be highlighted as examples of tailoring the microstructure (identity, size, shape and distribution of phases) of selected metallic alloys for enhanced corrosion/oxidation resistance, refurbishment by cladding and development of compositionally/microstructurally graded components. It will be evident that the final microstructure and composition of the laser irradiated zone primarily depends on the thermal history (temperature, thermal gradient, heating/cooling rate, etc) and specific material properties (composition, specific heat, thermal conductivity, etc) of the fusion/heat-affected zone. Most of the examples will be derived from the published results of this researcher and his colleagues. Finally, some allied studies on-plasma assisted surface engineering will be discussed to highlight the scope of developing nanostructured surface for improved wear/corrosion resistance of steel and non-ferrous alloys.

 

Biodata:

Professor Manna, currently the Director of IIT Kanpur and a JC Bose fellow, is an educationist and materials engineer with wide ranging research interests covering structure-property correlation and modeling in nanometric metals and ceramics, laser/plasma assisted surface engineering, nano-fluid and bainitic steel. Before moving to IIT Kanpur, he taught at IIT Kharagpur for 25 years and headed CSIR-CGCRI in Kolkata for 3 years. He is a Fellow of all the national academies of science and engineering in India and was selected as a distinguished alumnus by IIEST, Shibpur and IIT Kharagpur. He is a recipient of TWAS prize for engineering sciences (2014) and was recently elected a Fellow of TWAS (2015). He is currently the President of the Indian Institute of Metals and the Indian National Academy of Engineering.

 

 



Patrick Teevens

 

 

Patrick Teevens, CD, P. Eng., MCIC

President, Broadsword Corrosion Engineering Ltd, Canada

 

September 19th 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Doing ICDA for assessing integrity of pipelines – the correct way!

Abstract :

It has been 10 years since the first NACE International ICDA (Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment) was published and put forward for use by pipeline operators around the globe.  Over that past decade of 2006 – 2016, ICDA has evolved to now include three different standard practices with each successive one of them (in 2010 and 2016) progressively building upon the learnings and needs of the client to match and exceed the performance expectations of high resolution MFL (magnetic flux leakage) tools for the prediction accuracy of weight-loss (not cracking) in petroleum and related service pipelines.
 

This plenary lecture looks at the current status-quo of the recently released MP-ICDA Standard in terms of its capabilities and performance expectations as well as looking at how ICDA in general is conducted properly to ensure pipeline integrity is indeed done the correct way.  Although the Standards provide the requisite four step methodology which a practitioner must fully utilize, the ultimate success of the ICDA application is firmly entrenched in the quality and reliability of the data collected in the Preassessment step and using that Preassessment data to logically perform the momentum, heat and mass transfer mathematical computations found within the second or Indirect Inspection step.
 

It is anticipated that the audience will be able to better appreciate and discern the nuances which truly make ICDA successful and to better differentiate those “practitioners” who lack the requisite skill set, technical qualifications and experience to fulfil the performance expectations of the NACE International ICDA Standard Practices

Biodata:

Academic Qualification

Chemistry – B.Sc. (University of Calgary – 1978)

Chemical Engineering – Professional Engineer Alberta and British Columbia - 1991

 

Area of Specialization

NACE International – Corrosion Specialist, P (1985)

NACE International – Cathodic Protection Specialist (1985)

API 510 – Pressure Vessel Inspector (1992)

ABSA (Alberta) In-Service Pressure Vessel Inspector  (2003)

Advanced Corrosion Surveillance Techniques including real-time monitoring using electrochemical noise, harmonic distortion analysis and zero resistance ammetry.

Internal Corrosion Predictive Modeling (ICPM)

Forensic failure investigations

 

Achievements / Awards

•   Presented the NACE International, Northern Area (Canada and Alaska) 2001 Outstanding Service Award at Calgary on November 29, 2001.

•   Named as a guest Eminent Plenary Lecturer for the Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA), Corrosion and Prevention 2001 Conference scheduled for Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia in November, 2001.

•   Joint recipient (with Integriti Solutions – Aberdeen, Scotland) of the British Government Millennium Products Award  with Integriti Solutions Ltd. of Aberdeen, Scotland presented by UK Prime Minister Tony Blair in London, England (December, 1999) to Kenneth Mackenzie on behalf of  Pat and his team at AEC Oil & Gas.

•   Invited as a guest Plenary Lecturer for the NACE China Section/Chinese Academy of Sciences, First Annual NACE International- China Section Corrosion Conference at Chengdu, Sichuan, China from November 2 – 5, 2006

 

 



Carlos A. Palacios

 

 

Carlos A. Palacios T., Ph.D., M.Sc.

CIMA-TQ, LLC, Pearland, TX

 

September 20th 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Tips on Managing the Mechanical Integrity of the Assets from Downhole to Sales

Abstract :

A description of the experiences in managing corrosion in upstream facilities is presented. The journey starts at the reservoir, continues with the well casing, tubing including naturally producing wells and artificially lifted wells, e.g.: gas, electrical submersible pumps (ESP’s), sucker rod pumps, etc.  The corrosion severity and the estimation of the corrosion rates are very much dependent on the type of production system used. Therefore, to estimate the corrosion rates it becomes very important to clearly understand how each production system works. As the fluids are produced it passes through well heads, flow lines, flow stations, through the network of wet oil/gas pipelines as well as the network of “dry” gas/oil pipelines to sales.  Tips presented here allow for better assessment of their hydrodynamics which in turn helps determine how the corrosion phenomena that are taking place.

 

Biodata:

Dr. Carlos A. Palacios T. is a National Association of Engineers (NACE) certified Chemical Treatment Corrosion Specialist and an International Corrosion Specialist.  He is the author of numerous technical publications on corrosion. Carlos’ 35 years of experience in the oil and gas industry have resulted in his becoming a subject matter expert on internal corrosion, erosion, chemical treatment, material selection, water treatment, oil treatment, and corrosion monitoring in fields in Colombia, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Kuwait, and the US.  Dr. Palacios has been an instructor for 20 years and has extensive experience in leading seminars, developing and teaching industry courses, as well as serving as a professor for both undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Tulsa and various universities in South America.  He has taught and performed consulting  in many countries, including Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Turkey, USA, Mexico, Colombia, Spain, UAE, Vietnam, Venezuela, and India.  Carlos holds US patent # 7,942,200 for a Downhole Chemical Dispersion Device.  He was the International Director for the NACE Foundation from 2005-2013, was the recipient of the NACE Distinguished Service Award in March 2013, and currently leads technical committees in NACE international to develop standard practices.  Dr. Palacios has a BS, an MSc, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering, and Post-Doctoral studies in Erosion/ Corrosion from the University of Tulsa.

 

 



S S Mohanty

 

 

S S Mohanty

Formerly Steel Authority of India Ltd., New Delhi

 

September 20th 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Corrosion Resistant Steels for Industry

Abstract :

The requirement for the corrosion resistant steels in our country is increasing year after year. Both in flat and long segments, there is enough development in products and applications. Indian steel manufacturers have realised the colossal loss the country is incurring due to corrosion. Hence, there is lot of R&D by Indian steel manufacturers in the areas of corrosion resistant steel. There are many new grades of corrosion resistant steel in construction, engineering and automobile sectors.

This paper describes the present and future development of corrosion resistant steel.

 

Biodata:

Mr. S. S. Mohanty is a Leader in the field of Operations, Research, Business Planning, Project Management, Marketing and Engineering, Strategy Formulation in Steel Sector. He served as a Technical & Commercial Director of Steel Authority of India Ltd. until June 30, 2016. He was responsible for the Operations of all the production units, Research & Development, Environment Management, Materials Management, SAIL Refractory units, Special Steel Plants. His areas of expertise include: Steel Plant & Power Plant Operations (five Integrated Steel Plant, three Special Steel Plant, Captive power plant); • Technology, Research and Development (R&D expenditure is 0.6% turnover and around 400 patents and IPRs.Led the largest research organisation in steel sector in India); and, Marketing Management (13 MT of Finished steel and Alloy & Special Steel). He has two patents and 20 technical papers in the field. He was President, Indian Institute of Metals (IIM); Chairman of Metallurgical Engineering Division Council (MTDC) of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), Govt. of India(2013-present); Vice-Chairman, Sectoral Council for Skill development (Steel), Government of India (2014 - present); Founder Director & Member Secretary of SRTMI (Steel Research & Technology Mission of India) (2015 - present); Former Chairman, AIST India Chapter(2012-15); and, Distinguished Alumnus Award by NIT, Rourkela in 2014. He is a Mechanical Engineer and holder of Post Graduate Diploma in Industrial Management from NIT, Rourkela.

 

 



Thomas L. Ladwein

 

 

Thomas L. Ladwein
Aalen University of Applied Science, Aalen, Germany

 

September 21st 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Qualified Workforce as Prerequisite for Minimising the Cost of Corrosion

 

 

Abstract

Preventing and mitigating corrosion issues can be achieved through numerous technical approaches. An important and often overlooked factor is to have the engineers and technicians who understand all the fundamental as well as the hands on aspects of corrosion in order to select the optimum ad most cost effective solution. Vocational Training and basic academic education are equally important. Ideas for academic curricula at various levels are discussed.

 

Biodata :

Studied chemistry and metallurgy at the University Muenster in Germany
Graduated with M.S. (1980) and PhD in 1984
20 years industrial experience in corrosion resistant alloys and stainless steels
Since 2003 fulltime professor for electrochemistry, corrosion and tribology at Aalen University, Aalen, Germany.
NACE European Area Director 2015 – 2018
Recipient of H.H. Uhlig Award 2011

 

 



N. Eswara Prasad

 

 

N. Eswara Prasad

Defence Materials and Stores Research and Development Establishment (DMSRDE), DRDO, Kanpur

 

 

September 21st 2016: 09:00 - 10:30, Main Hall

 

Topic: Aerospace and Naval Materials for Chemically Aggressive Environments

 

Abstract

Aerospace materials, such as the materials for airframe, aero engine and aero missiles are some of the highly complicated and most advanced of the present day structural materials, selected and employed for various structural applications based on their high specific modulus and specific strength, with adequate fatigue, fracture and corrosion resistances. On the other hand, the naval materials are expected to have high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures, enhanced corrosion and SCC resistances with good fabricability and weldability, apart from being economical due to their large tonnage requirements.

India in recent decades has made several significant strides in alloy development, material as well as component production and established innovative methodologies in fabrication, characterisation, testing (both DT and NDT) and qualification for many a applications. Some of these programmes included concurrent development of materials for air and sea environments, where the systems having these components not only have to experience severe stringent design limitations, cutting edge performances, but also complex and aggressive chemical environments. The present talk introduces the methodologies adopted for concurrent development of various aerospace and naval materials, such as Al, Ti, Nimonic alloys and speciality steels for aggressive chemical environments. Innovations in materials development and component fabrication will be discussed in detail to illustrate strategies adopted to withstand and perform in the chemically aggressive environments.

 

Acknowledgements: The author gratefully acknowledges the inputs for this talk from several of his colleagues – Mr. B Saha, Mr B Jana, Mr.ChVS Murthy, Mr. P Rambabu and Dr. MSK Rao. He is thankful to DRDO for the support and funding to conduct some of the studies.

Biodata:

Dr. N Eswara Prasad, FIE, FAPAS, FIIM, FAeSIhas been working on Design, Development, Life Prediction and Certification for Airworthy Production of Structural Materials and Components for Defence Aero Applications since 1985 at DRDO units. His research contributions are principally in the development of Al & Al-Li alloys; Mo & Ti Intermetallics; Aero and Speciality Steels; Nimonic alloys;Functional materials; Monolithic ceramics such as Structural Alumina, Graphite and SiC; Carbon and SiC based Continuous Fibre-reinforced, Ceramic-matrix Composites (CFCCs). Dr. Prasad has more than 190 peer-reviewed publications (including 16 edited books and 26 written book chapters) and over 300 confidential reports & airworthiness certification documents to his credit. His works on the Deformation & Fracture Behaviour, Fatigue Power-law Relationships, Creep – Fatigue Interactions (CFI), Micro Mechanisms of Fatigue & Fracture and Life Prediction have earned him many national and international recognitions: Young Scientist of ISCA (1991), Young Metallurgist of IIM (1994), Visiting Scientist of Max-Planck-Instittut and Research Fellowship of Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation of Germany (1998-1999), Binani Gold Medal of IIM (2006), Fellow of Institution of Engineers (2009), Metallurgist of the Year of Ministry of Steel, Government of India (2010), Fellow of Indian Institute of Metals (2011), Fellow AP Akademi of Sciences (2011), AICTE-INAE Distinguished Visiting Professor (2012), IIT(BHU)-MET Distinguished AluminusAward (2013) and the covetedDr. VM Ghatge Award of Aeronautical Society of India (2014).In recognition of his phenomenal contributions in the Development and Certification of several advanced aerospace materials, Dr. Prasad had been recently elected as Fellow of the prestigious Aeronautical Society of India – the FAeSI (2016).Dr. Prasad presently is the Director of Defence Materials and Stores R&D Establishment (DMSRDE), Kanpur, India.

 



Jean-Marc Dewilde

 

 

Jean-Marc Dewilde

Managing Director, Elsyca

 

Symposia: Cathodic Protection - 1

 

September 19th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: A case study on AC model validation

 

Abstract
 

Pipelines that are in colocation with AC power transmission lines and underground cables require computational modeling for determining the human safety and pipeline integrity risks, like AC corrosion prevention.

Many parameters from the pipeline and power line need to be taken into account for an accurate and representative simulation. However in many cases not all relevant data is available on the possible interference conditions and assumptions need to be made in the model. This often leads to conservative mitigation designs resulting in extensive investments. 

This article is a case study that discusses a set of field measurements that have been performed in an AC corridor. Measurements were performed on the existing pipeline and in the surrounding soil. A model with mitigation system was elaborated given the provided characteristics of the future power line. After installation of the mitigation system the power line was energized and more comprehensive field measurements, as part of the AC mitigation system commissioning, have been performed for validating the initial outcome of the computational model for steady-state conditions.

The proposed field measurements can be used for generating data for new and existing constructions where there is a lack of information on the pipeline or power line system, or a more realistic representation of the situation is required. Various what-if scenarios such as increased steady-state current load or line fault conditions are simulated. As such a cost-effective design is obtained and investment justified.

Biodata
 

Jean-Marc Dewilde is Managing Director of Elsyca. Jean-Marc joined Elsyca in 2007 as Vice-President Sales and was entrusted with the general management of the company in 2011. Jean-Marc obtained his MSc in mechanical engineering from Ghent University (UG) and holds a post-graduate in aerospace engineering from the University of Brussels (VUB). He worked as aerospace simulation engineer in ESTEC in The Netherlands, the technical heart of the European Space Agency. Between 1994 and 2007, Jean-Marc held various engineering and management positions at LMS International in Leuven, Belgium. In his last role at LMS, Jean-Marc headed the UK office as regional director.

 



Pradip Khaladkar

 

 

Pradip Khaladkar

Principal Consultant, PECT Consulting

Hockessin, Delaware, USA

 

Symposia: Corrosion in Petrochemical, Chemical, Fertilizer Industries and Refineries – 1

 

September 19th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – C

 

Topic: Using Ultrasonic Technique to Determine Fitness for Service of FRP Equipment for Chemical Handling Applications

 

Abstract

Fiberglass reinforced plastic materials are well suited to a wide variety of chemical handling equipment where resistance to corrosion is required.  A significant impediment to adoption of these materials for many suitable applications lies with the inability to do a fitness for service determination after the equipment and piping have been in service.  This is largely due to the lack of effective non-destructive and non-intrusive techniques for plastic materials. This paper presents a case study of a fiberglass reinforced plastic scrubber which was evaluated with a novel ultrasonic technique followed by a destructive evaluation for retained mechanical properties and corrosion barrier condition.  When compared, the results showed good correlation. Although the FRP unit was already discarded this study indicated that significant life had still remained.

 

Biodata
 

·         B.Tech,(IIT Bombay) and MS (University of West Virginia) in Chemical Engineering

·         Dupont Company, Wilmington, DE, USA 1978-2015-- Principal Consultant

·         Elected Fellow of the Materials Technology Institute, St. Louis, MO USA 2014

·         Author, “Fluoropolymers for Chemical Handling Applications” 2004 PDL Publishing

·         Author of chapters – Perry’s Chemical Engineering Handbook, Uhlig’s Corrosion

          Handbook, ASM, AWS, Modern Fluoropolymers (Wiley)

·         Papers: NACE, SPI, ACHEMA

·         Engineering Excellence Award – DuPont Company, 2004

 



Søren Eriksen

 

 

Søren Eriksen

R&D Manager, Tantaline A/S

 

 

Symposia: Corrosion in Petrochemical, Chemical, Fertilizer Industries and Refineries – 1

 

September 19th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – C

 

Topic: Applications for Tantalum Surface Alloy in Hot Concentrated Acids

 

 

 

Abstract

Tantalum is an obvious solution to the ever growing need for corrosion resistant materials to cope with harsh conditions as engineers push processes to gain more efficient production. Traditionally the use of tantalum has been limited by very high cost and consequently limited availability of process equipment. Tantalum surface alloying is a convenient alternative to high nickel alloys, zirconium and traditional tantalum solutions for severe acidic corrosion environments: short lead times compared to specialty metals and cost very competitive to conventional tantalum products.

Zero corrosion has been demonstrated in hot hydrochloric, acetic and sulfuric acids during 4-6week test periods as expected for tantalum. Severe mechanical deformation (U-bending) and thermal cycling (100 times water quench from 300°C) has been demonstrated not to impair the corrosion resistance.

Applications cases: 1. Heat Exchanger for cooling sulfuric acid after dilution. Reduced maintenance and down time compared with previous graphite block heat exchanger. 2. Flanged ball valves for glass lined reactor. Gas tight closure in the presence of hydrochloric acid vapors is maintained throughout a service life of years is obtained. 3. Pressurized laboratory reactor for corrosion testing in hydrogen sulfide containing acid environment. Tests are only feasible using tantalum. Tantalum surface alloy is used in the place of solid tantalum or tantalum cladding.

The tantalum vapor surface alloying technology utilizes the superior corrosion resistance properties of tantalum. Tantalum metal is deposited in a vacuum furnace at 700-900°C by Chemical Vapor Deposition. Typical substrates are stainless steel which gives a rich abundance of products for chemical industry. Other materials:  high nickel alloys, low carbon steel, copper, tungsten or ceramics can be tantalum treated to meet special requirements.

 

Biodata

Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Denmark 

Since graduating in 1996, Soren Eriksen has worked in research and industrial development related to Chemical Vapor Deposition processes for tantalum surface alloying. The first years as a Ph.D. student laid the foundation for an industrial pilot scale setup with Danfoss from year 2000. In 2008 Soren Eriksen was part of spinning out Tantaline as an independent company and establishing industrial scale production facility.

A large portion of the technical work has been development of products where the tantalum surface alloy is an integral part of the design. Products range from chemical processing equipment to implantable medical devices

 

Areas of interest:

Corrosion and corrosion testing in severe acidic conditions

Metallurgy

Chemical Vapor Deposition

Chemical processing equipment

Business development

 

 



Dr. Ing. Smrutiranjan Parida

 

 

Dr. Ing. Smrutiranjan Parida

 

Symposia: Students Symposium - 1

 

 

September 19th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: Anticorrosion coatings using graphene and graphene oxide

 

Abstract
 

 Coating is one of the viable ways to corrosion mitigation. That led to development of various coatings based on inorganic, organic and composite materials. The new generation of composite coatings involving nanocarbon and polymer matrix has been a thrust area of research. Such forms of coating are envisaged to not only improve corrosion protection but increase mechanical property and adhesion. However, enhanced performance of the composite coating depend lot on the processing and aspect ratio of the nanocarbon. In addition to that, the applicability of the nanocarbon materials is related to the economics of their bulk preparations, which calls for development of cost effective synthesis methods. Depending on the synthesis procedure followed the surface characteristics of the nanocarbon material will decide the final properties of the composite coating. The presentation will give a broad perspective on above aspects based on the current experimental results.

 

Biodata
 

Asst. prof.at Metallurgical Engg. & Mat. Sc, IIT Bombay since sept. 2011.

Main interest: corrosion mitigation through smart coatings

Postdoctorate: Dept. Chem. Engg, University of Toronto, Canada

Visiting scientist : materials Divn. IGCAR , kalpakkam

PhD: Institute for Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany

M.Tech: Materials Science center, IIT Kharagpur

DAAD fellowship , IFW Dresden, Germany, 2002

 



RANI P. GEORGE

 

 

RANI P. GEORGE
Head, Surface Modification & Characterization Section, Scientific Officer G,

Corrosion Science & Technology Group

Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam

 

 

Symposia: Marine and Offshore Corrosion

 

September 19th 2016: 14:00 - 15:30, Hall – B

 

Topic: Performance of Structural Materials in Marine Environments

 

Abstract

Seawater is an aggressive environment that interacts in varying degrees with the structural materials exposed to it leading to biofouling and deterioration undermining its performance and durability. The huge requirement of cooling water and the scarcity of fresh water resources have led to the natural choice of locating power plants in the coastal sites where copious amount of seawater is available.  The 500 MWe Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) coming up at Kalpakkam, India will use about 30 m3sec-1 of cooling water for extracting heat from the condenser and other auxiliary heat exchanger systems for efficient operation. However, use of seawater brings associated problems like colonization of biota that can reduce the efficiency of heat exchange in condenser systems and deterioration of concrete structures. Based on the excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical properties titanium is selected as the condenser material of PFBR. However due to its biocompatibility severe biofouling is expected that can affect steam condensation and cause condenser back pressure. This can reduce power generation capacity and immensely cost the utility. Similarly the concrete structures in nuclear installations especially cooling water structures like tanks, pillars and reservoirs need to resist the seawater environments. This paper summarizes the work carried out towards improving the performance of titanium condenser material and developing modified concrete for seawater environments. Advanced technologies like ultrasound, electrochemical and nanotechnology were adopted to thwart the aggressive effects of marine environment. Good biofouling control of titanium surface was achieved by ultrasonication of cooling water medium, application of alternate anodic and cathodic potential to Ti tubes and electroless Cu thin film coating in the inside tube surface.  A high quality impermeable concrete skin to resist the chemical and biological attack of seawater was attempted by using 40% supplementary cementitious flyash material and 2% nanophase modification. Thus the 40% flyash concrete modified by both TiO2 and CaCO3 nanoparticles in the ratio of 1:1 replacing the 2% OPC referred to as FATC concrete showed optimum properties and has emerged to be a potential candidate for seawater applications after one year long exposure studies in Kalpakkam coastal waters. The presentation highlights the above results in comparison with the earlier works in literature.

Biodata

Dr. Rani P. George joined in Corrosion Science and Technology Division (CSTD) of IGCAR, Kalpakkam as DAE Research Fellow in life science and after obtaining her Ph.D. in the specialized field of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) and Biofouling joined CSTD as Scientist in 2000. Dr. Rani has worked with Prof. R.C. Newman as visiting scientist at the Corrosion protection Centre of UMIST, UK in 1998, she has developed an early biofilm monitor based on galvanic coupling and intermittent polarization of two identical SS electrodes. In 2010 she became Leader of Surface Modification Programme, and in 2016 she became Head, Surface Modification & Charcaterization section, and is associated with seven young scientists and taking care of development of corrosion and biofouling resistant coatings for seawater and humid coastal atmospheric applications. She has 78 papers published in International journals and 40 conference proceedings. She has won several best paper awards and technical excellence award in recognition of her R&D contributions, including S.K. Seshadri memorial MASCOT Award form ECSI Bengaluru (2015),  NIGIS Corrosion Awareness Award for Excellence in Corrosion Science and Technology (2010) and IIM Certificate of Honor at 48th NMD-ATM, 2010. She has delivered 7th Mayanna Endowment Lecture in NSEST 2010. She is Fellow of Indian Institute of Metals and life member of several professional associations like IIM, ECSI, SAEST, ASCI, SFA and IWSA, and for past six years member of NACE International. She is serving as Treasurer for NIGIS South Zone since 2013.

 

 



Dr. M P Sukumaran Nair

 

 

Dr. M P Sukumaran Nair

Titanium Products Ltd

 

Symposia: Corrosion in Petrochemical, Chemical, Fertilizer Industries and Refineries – 2

 

 

September 19th 2016: 14:00 - 15:30, Hall – C
 

Topic: Tackling Corrosion in Primary Reformers

 

Abstract

The tubular primary reformer furnace is the workhorse and the heart of the ammonia plant, the reliability of which has a tremendous impact on its economics of operation. Creep ruptures failure; high temperature corrosion and external erosion are major contributory factors leading to deterioration of the service life of primary reformer catalyst tubes in fertilizer plants. Since the advent of ICI steam hydrocarbon reforming for ammonia production there has been concerted efforts for over fifty years to improve tube metallurgy and consequently enhance the reliability of the plant. From highly alloyed stainless steels to centrifugally cast and internally machined austenitic stainless steel tubes to molybdenum and tungsten stabilized tubes to micro alloys modified steels, the journey has been indeed demanding at every stage and also contributed by learning from past failures. These innovations are linked to their manufacturing processes, material composition, mechanical characteristics, plant operating parameters and catalyst improvements. In this paper I would like to attempt a review of the course of developments that have taken place in the development of primary reformer tubes over the years and indicate the direction of future innovations needed.

 

Biodata

Chairman of the Public Sector Industries Restructuring and Audit Board an apex authority over 42 state level public undertakings. Additional Chief Secretaries of Finance and Industries departments are members of the board which oversees to reform and strengthen the performance of the companies. . Currently he is also the Managing Director of Travancore Titanium Products Ltd.

He holds BS degrees in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and is a Postgraduate in Ecology and Environment. Dr. Nair also has an MBA (Marketing), PhD in Environment Management and has published more than 100 technical/management papers at National/International Forums /Publications.

 

Besides being a corporate manager and researcher, he is well experienced in planning, design, operations and troubleshooting in the processing industry. His specializations include consulting in facilities planning, engineering, design, project TEFR and DPR, pilot plant scale up, corrosion and material selection, failure analysis, process plant environment, health, safety and risk management.

 

He is an international speaker at several technical and management forums, regular contributor to Hydrocarbon Processing, Nitrogen and Syngas, Fertilizer International, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Weekly and Chemical Industry Digest and reviewer of ASM International and UNDP Millennium Ecosystem Assessment reports.

 

Dr. Nair is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers (India), Member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and the European Federation of Chemical Engineers (EFCE). He is very actively associated with various Professional bodies and Institutions and serves on several expert advisory committees to the Central and State Governments in India.

 

A recipient of the Outstanding Chemical Engineer award of the Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers (IIChemE) and a Distinguished Alumnus of the Institution of Engineers (India), he is listed in the Marquis’ Who’s Who in the World.

 

 



Jeffrey L. Didas

 

 

Jeffrey L. Didas

Senior Corrosion Engineer

Matcor, Inc., Chalfont, PA USA

 

 

Symposia: Coatings & Linings - 1

 

September 19th 2016: 14:00 - 15:30, Hall – D

 

Topic: Atmospheric Corrosion Inspection of Above Ground Piping

 

Abstract

Inspection of above ground piping for atmospheric corrosion is a critical step in corrosion prevention. It becomes difficult or impossible when pipe supports, hold down clamps, foundations and complex structures limit the ability of the corrosion professional to perform an atmospheric inspection. This paper will discuss industry issues with pipe supports, hold down clamps and foundations, how to mitigate these issues and suggest inspectable supports & hold down clamps for remediation and new construction.

 

Biodata

NACE Vice President Elect

NACE International certified – corrosion specialist-cathodic protection specialist-protective coating specialist and chemical treatment specialist.

SSPC – protective coating specialist

BSEE Electrical Engineering – Thomas A Edison State College, Trenton, NJ USA

ASEE Electronics Technology – Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield, MA USA

NACE member since 01-01-1975

 



Pankaj Panchal

 

 

 

Pankaj Panchal

Corrosion Consultant (Middle East & India) , Saudi Arabia

 

Symposia: Cathodic Protection - 2

 

September 19th 2016: 16:00 - 18:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: Cathodic Protection Design Considerations for Multiple Well Casings

 

 

Abstract
 

It is a challenging job to design a cathodic protection (CP) system for new well casings with good coating placed in vicinity of already existing bare (non-coated) well casings. Mainly due to considerations for current distribution between the former and the later as the both must be integrated to avoid interference. For a suitable design there are number of controlling factors that need to be taken into account such as well casing resistance remote to earth, back emf, flowline and trunk line resistances and negative cable resistance.

 

This paper presents various scenarios of multiple well casing CP system design.

 

Ø  Design concept for dual bare well casings.

Ø  Design concept for three or more bare well casings.

Ø  Design concept for existing bare and new coated well casings.

ü  Current distribution by controlling the negative cable resistance.

ü  Current distribution by flow line / trunk line resistance.

Ø  Design variable effecting the current distribution.

Case study of multiple well casings. 

 

Biodata
 

Mr. Panchal is Electrical Engineer. He has 20+ years of experience in Cathodic Protection and Corrosion control systems including Survey, Design, Engineering, Project Management, analysis, inspection and troubleshooting in the Corrosion Industries.

 

Mr. Panchal is NACE Certified Corrosion Specialist and Cathodic Protection Specialist. He is NACE Instructor for CP-1,CP-2, CP-3 and CP-4 courses.

 

He is having cathodic protection systems and corrosion control system survey, design, projects, operation and maintenance experience for :

Ø  Onshore : Pipelines, Plants, Well Casings, Tanks Bottom, Tank Internals & Process Vessels.

Ø  Offshore : Platforms, Pipelines, Well Casings & Jetties.

Ø  AC / DC Interference study and mitigation.

Ø  Integrity Management.

 

He is having working experience in  Middle East and India.

 



Pankaj Panchal

 

 

 

Pankaj Panchal

Corrosion Consultant (Middle East & India) , Saudi Arabia

 

Symposia: Cathodic Protection - 2

 

September 19th 2016: 16:00 - 18:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: Cathodic Protection Design Considerations for Multiple Well Casings

 

 

Abstract
 

It is a challenging job to design a cathodic protection (CP) system for new well casings with good coating placed in vicinity of already existing bare (non-coated) well casings. Mainly due to considerations for current distribution between the former and the later as the both must be integrated to avoid interference. For a suitable design there are number of controlling factors that need to be taken into account such as well casing resistance remote to earth, back emf, flowline and trunk line resistances and negative cable resistance.

 

This paper presents various scenarios of multiple well casing CP system design.

 

Ø  Design concept for dual bare well casings.

Ø  Design concept for three or more bare well casings.

Ø  Design concept for existing bare and new coated well casings.

ü  Current distribution by controlling the negative cable resistance.

ü  Current distribution by flow line / trunk line resistance.

Ø  Design variable effecting the current distribution.

Case study of multiple well casings. 

 

Biodata
 

Mr. Panchal is Electrical Engineer. He has 20+ years of experience in Cathodic Protection and Corrosion control systems including Survey, Design, Engineering, Project Management, analysis, inspection and troubleshooting in the Corrosion Industries.

 

Mr. Panchal is NACE Certified Corrosion Specialist and Cathodic Protection Specialist. He is NACE Instructor for CP-1,CP-2, CP-3 and CP-4 courses.

 

He is having cathodic protection systems and corrosion control system survey, design, projects, operation and maintenance experience for :

Ø  Onshore : Pipelines, Plants, Well Casings, Tanks Bottom, Tank Internals & Process Vessels.

Ø  Offshore : Platforms, Pipelines, Well Casings & Jetties.

Ø  AC / DC Interference study and mitigation.

Ø  Integrity Management.

 

He is having working experience in  Middle East and India.

 



Bert de Bok

 

 

Bert de Bok

Technical manager , Transocean coatings, Rotterdam, Netherlands

 

Symposia: Coatings & Linings - 2

 

September 19th 2016: 16:00 - 18:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: Corrosion control with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy measuring technique

 

Abstract
 

The need for reliable judgement and evaluation of coatings has become increasingly important. This is true for inspection as well as for the selection of proper coating systems. Current evaluation methods are mostly based on accelerated weathering testing schemes. However, literature indicates that such tests hardly correlate well with practice, provide unreliable data and are based on visual examinations of rust spreading from a scratch. For field inspection, only visual assessment combined with thickness measurements and sometimes adhesion measurements are the way to evaluate the condition of a coating system.

Such methods only provide answer on the current state, no indication can be given of remaining service life or the effectiveness of corrosion protection by the intact coating system.

Besides, often the coating is damaged and need to be repaired afterwards.

Electrochemical Impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is an electrochemical measuring method that quantifies the protective behavior of coatings.

With (EIS) the condition of intact coatings and the effectiveness of corrosion protection can be measured in a non-destructive way and provides quantitative data on the corrosive properties of the coating.

ISO 16773 deals with EIS but only describes how to carry out measurements but provide no guidance on how to judge or analysis the data. In this paper the author will demonstrate the importance of proper data processing, analysis and finally applying the results in practice conditions as well as in R&D.

 

 

Biodata
 

Chemistry at the University of Amsterdam

General R&D at Ameron. In total 4 years at Ameron

General R&D at Sigma Coatings

Manager 2 component primers at Sigma Coating

Manager IT at Sigma Coatings laboratory

Manager anti-fouling at Sigma Coatings

Manager service and development at Sigma Coatings

Manager fouling release coatings at Sigma Coatings

In total 22 years at PPG/Sigma Coatings

Technical manager at Transocean Coatings. 7 years now.

So in total 33 years active in the protective coatings industry.

 



Michael Tachick

 

 

Michael Tachick

President, Dairyland Electrical Industries Inc.

 

Symposia: Cathodic Protection - 3

 

September 20th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: AC Voltage Mitigation and Safety Grounding Practices on Cathodic Protection Systems

Abstract

Effective cathodic protection requires electrical isolation of structures from foreign structures and grounding systems, yet unsafe voltage can be present on ungrounded structures, necessitating methods to address both issues. Common examples of such over-voltage conditions include steady-state AC induction from overhead power lines, AC faults, and lightning. Best practices and industry guidance will be presented on addressing AC voltage mitigation without affecting cathodic protection, lightning over-voltage effects that are unique compared to AC events, step and touch voltage control near cathodically protected structures, and grounding and bonding practices. Decoupling practices to address both DC isolation and AC continuity will be presented. Finally, a brief review of hazardous areas will be presented, as various over-voltage protection schemes occur within classified hazardous areas and must be properly applied.

Biodata

Michael Tachick graduated from Michigan Technological University with a degree in Electrical Engineering, and joined Dairyland Electrical Industries, a manufacturer of solid-state protection products. Specializing in product design and application, he often speaks on topics of over-voltage protection, safety grounding, isolation, and optimizing cathodic protection systems, dealing with such issues as AC faults, AC induction, lightning protection, DC interference, and related regulations. He typically provides technical guidance to power utilities, pipeline companies, consultants, and contractors in the energy industries.  Michael currently serves as President of Dairyland Electrical Industries. 

 

 



Dr Robert Francis

 

 

Dr Robert Francis

Principal, R A Francis Consulting Services

 

Symposia: Coatings & Linings - 3

 

September 20th 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: A Review of the Use, Application And Problems With Inorganic Zinc Silicate Coatings

 

Abstract
 

 A single coat water-borne or solvent-borne inorganic zinc silicate is a proven long-term coating, especially in marine atmospheric environments. It allows rapid throughput of coating work and, as a relatively thin single coat, is very economical. Nevertheless, when specifying or applying this material, there are a number of critical factors which must be considered if coating failures are to be avoided. This paper looks at issues relating to selection, application and maintenance of these coatings such as when mixing and applying these coatings, differences between water borne and solvent borne products and how the two types cure and their environmental requirements. It also looks at issues with coatings that are too thick or too thin, methods for repair and considerations when topcoating inorganic zincs.

Biodata
 

Dr Robert Francis is a corrosion and coatings consultant with his own company, R A Francis Consulting Services. He has over 40 years’ experience in corrosion and coatings. His experience also covers ferrous metals, technical training and quality assurance. He previously worked in corrosion and coatings with Aurecon (formerly Connell Wagner) in their Materials Technology Group in Melbourne. He has also worked with the Australasian Corrosion Association, Department of Materials Engineering at Monash University and for BHP Steel Long Products Division, Whyalla in South Australia.

Dr. Francis obtained a B.Sc. in metallurgy from the University of Melbourne and has a Ph.D. in corrosion science from the Corrosion and Protection Centre at the University of Manchester, UK.

He is a member of a number of Australian Standards committees concerned with corrosion and protective coatings, including Chairman of Committee MT 14/2 producing AS/NZS 2312 (Guide to the protection of structural steel against atmospheric corrosion by the use of protective coatings) and Chairman of Committee MT 14/5 producing AS 4312 (Atmospheric corrosivity zones in Australia).

He has authored or co-authored over forty technical papers or presentations on corrosion and coatings at conferences in Australia and overseas, and in corrosion journals, from 1978 to the present. He is in the top 1% of views on the Academia.edu web site. He edited the publication “Inorganic Zinc Coatings”, for the ACA in 2013. He has been awarded the JPCL editor’s award twice and was made a JPCL Top Thinker in 2012. He was awarded the ACA Victor Nightingall Award in 2014 for his contributions to the protective coating industry in Australia.

He is an active member of the Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA), and was Australasian President in 2000, and is a member of NACE International and SSPC. He is an ACA certified Coating Inspector, an NACE Coating Inspector, an ACA Corrosion Technologist and a regular presenter of a number of corrosion related training courses, including the NACE Coating Inspection Program, ACA Corrosion Technology, ACA Coating Selection and Specification.

 

 



Craig Botha

 

 

Craig Botha

Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Reignite (Pty) Ltd, Nace Instructor

 

Symposia: Cathodic Protection – 4

 

September 20th 2016: 14:00 - 16:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: Benchmarking International Cathodic Protection and Alternating Current Mitigation Standards to Determine Suitable Protection Criteria

Abstract

From time to time international standards are withdrawn, amended, updated or new standards are introduced that change the current thinking on existing subject matter. This paper demonstrates the complex process of reviewing a number of prominent Cathodic Protection and Alternating Current Mitigation standards and then attempting to benchmark suitable protection criteria. Today common Right of Way issues exist due to the convergence of pipelines, high voltage powerlines, telecommunications and other services that produce an environment conducive to rapid corrosion on previously secure pipeline assets.

In this paper we review aspects of ISO15589-1 Part 1, NACE SP0169, EN50162, EN13509, NACE TM0497, NACE RP0104 and the work of NACE International Task Groups 210 and 211. In addition to these classical works relating to Cathodic Protection, this paper gives attention is given to aspects of the contemporary Alternating Current standards and reports namely NACE SP0177, BS EN 15280 and NACE International Technical Report 35110.

As these documents are unpacked and assessed it soon becomes evident that the exclusive use of Cathodic Protection in a highly congested Right of Way does not guarantee that corrosion will be curtailed on well coated, buried steel pipelines.

Some comments and recommendations are made to guide the thinking of engineers, pipeline owners and operators towards applying suitable designs and more importantly monitoring the most critical variables in predicting the probability of corrosion in complex Alternating Current and Direct Current environments.

 

Biodata
 

Mr Craig Botha received his Bachelors in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa in 1991. He has been an active member of NACE and the Corrosion Institute of Southern Africa (CORRISA) since 1995. He served as the Honorary Treasurer and NACE Administrator of CORRISA facilitating NACE courses in South Africa. He is a registered Professional Engineer, a NACE Instructor and has published papers on Pipeline Integrity Management and Cathodic Protection. He was awarded Consulting Engineer of the Year 2013 by CORRISA. He is the CEO of Reignite (Pty) Ltd and based in Durban, South Africa.

 



Vivek Naik

 

 

Vivek Naik

President Elect, Indian Concrete Institute (ICI) and

Managing Director,  Apple Chemie India Pvt. Ltd, Nagpur

 

Symposia: Reinforced Concrete - 1

 

September 20th 2016: 14:00 - 16:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: Corrosion of Reinforced Cement Concrete Structures & Innovative Ways for Mitigation

Abstract
Reinforced cement concrete is a versatile cost effective & profitable construction material. Corrosion of RCC is the most frequent cause of concrete deterioration. Losses due to corrosion of reinforced cement concrete are very heavy . Corrosion protection in reinforced cement concrete is somewhat complex due to the fact that reinforced cement concrete can deteriorate by carbonation of concrete as well as  by corrosion of reinforcing steel bars. 

 

To reduce the risk of corrosion of RCC structures several methods are available. Some methods are based on  adding corrosion inhibitors and some on provision of corrosion resistant coatings for reinforcing steel bars. 

The different type of surface coating that have been utilized for the protection of RCC include epoxy resins, polyurethane, silaoxane  & cement polymer composite coating & acrylic dispersions which also protect the embedded steel. Corrosion inhibitors of several types ( bothinorganic as well as organic) have been successfully used as admixtures to concrete. 

 

In recent years interest has been shown in the development of coatings which provide a corrosion resistant surface by interacting with the corrosion products of steel. There are a variety of mechanisms by which these coatings work. They can be classified as products that impregnate rust, convert rust to magnetite, inactivate soluble salts or convert iron oxides to other products. 

 Rust conversion coatings are promoted as water based products reacting directly with a rusted surface to form inert , water insoluble complex that can be top coated. The vast majority of rust converters incorporate some type of a polyhydroxylated or tannin like compound. 

 

In Indian construction industry losses due to corrosion are estimated to be more than Rs 9000 Cr and are increasing due to higher speed of unprotected concrete and steel structures. Mitigation of the corrosion problem is to be taken up with new chemistry and at a very competitive cost .

 

Biodata

  • Civil Engineer with specialization in Construction Management from IIM-Ahmedabad.
  • Bureau of Indian Standard Commitee CED-2, Member on IS 3370, IS 10262 , S-9103 - Concrete Admixtures, Concrete subcommittee CED 2.2, Prefabrication code committee CED-51. 
  • Indian Representative, ISO/TC/71 – Reinforced and pre-stressed concrete.
  • Delivered Lectures on  repair & restoration of infrastructure, designing of road bridges & railway bridges. Use of innovative products in infrastructure developments – Road, Power Plant. Delivered More than 200 lectures. Presented more than 50 papers in various National & International seminars. 
  • Best paper adjourned at Singapore conference for bridge restoration. 
  • Experience:- Work in Bagdad, Iraq for 4 years on large scale housing project. He was in-charge of construction of Palace in Doha-Quatar. 
  • His company did repair & restoration of The Taj Mahal at Agra. He participated in large scale bridge restoration and project receiving awards from ACI& ACCE. 
  • He has patent on his name for the manufacturer of Polycarboxylate Ether - ViscoFlux Technology and felicitated by Government under Make In India by FICCI.

 



Rolf Gubner

 

Rolf Gubner

Professor of Corrosion

Deputy Director Advanced Learning

Curtin Corrosion Engineering Industry Centre

Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

 

Symposia: Materials and Composites  - 1

 

September 20th 2016: 16:30 - 18:00, Hall – B

 

Topic: Composite Pipelines – Will Steel Pipelines Become Obsolete?

 

Abstract
 

Long Pipes objective is the elimination of corrosion; using its “No Joints” continuous composite pipeline the “Fluid Highway™”.

This composite pipeline  is designed to be constructed on site without joints it is “spliced” together to form a continuous, joint free, corrosion resistant inner liner, composite reinforcements and a corrosion resistant outer casing that provide the pipeline with unique properties making it suitable for the transportation of extremely corrosive fluids; such as high temperature brines and sulphurous steam for geo thermal power, to raw CO2 liquid directly from coal fired power stations for geo sequestration. This is in addition to its normal applications for the long distance transportation of fluids: gas (sour), oil (sour), water and slurry transport.

The total elimination of all materials degradation in every form forever, is impossible; however the composite pipeline comes closest to this objective using its unique continuous construction technology. With its inner and outer corrosion protecting the reinforcements; carbon, basalt, glass or Kevlar embedded in a Vinyl Ester resin matrix are free from attack from the fluids being transported and the external environment.

Using this system, we as engineers can now design long and short distance transportation networks to handle high pressure corrosive and abrasive fluids from nuclear power plants to irrigation networks and expect them to be maintenance free for decades, to generations to come.

This paper is an introduction to the Fluid Highway™ its development, benefits and limitations, so design engineers can consider designing efficient, environmentally friendlier, transportation  networks for the future. 

 

 

Biodata
 

Rolf Gubner joined Curtin University in 2008 as Chevron-Woodside Chair in Corrosion Engineering. Prior to this, he was department head for Industrial Processes at the Swedish Corrosion Institute working on automotive, pulp&paper, drinking water and microbiologically influenced corrosion problems.

 



Krishnan Balasubramanian

 

 

Krishnan Balasubramanian

Chair Professor and Dean

Indian Institute of Technology Madras

Chennai INDIA 600036

 

Symposia: Corrosion in Petrochemical, Chemical, Fertilizer Industries and Refineries – 5

 

September 20th 2016: 16:30 - 18:00, Hall – C
 

Topic: Applications for Tantalum Surface Alloys in Hot Concentrated Acids

Abstract

The integrity of the tank floor’s annular plate is critical to the long term performance assurance. The tanks that are located near to the water bodies have recently been known to be vulnerable to “groovy” corrosion that are particularly located under the shell or very close to it. The criticality of such corrosion is relatively very high due to the risk of catastrophic failure of the tank due to the location of such corrosion. Currently used NDT approaches do not address this and is limited to the inside region of the tank.

 

Similarly, the pipe support locations and other critical bottom regions of the pipes are inaccessible for routine inspection and are also subjected to higher probability of corrosion. The location and the consequence of leak are often cost prohibitive unless the prognostics of such damage phenomena is assessed based on NDT techniques that are capable of detection, location, and sizing of corrosion in a quantitative manner.

 

This presentation reports the use of dispersive Higher Order Modes Guided Waves Higher order modes cluster guided waves (HOMC-GW) which are highly non-dispersive over some distance of propagation. The HOMC-GW technique is a recently explored phenomenon which appears to have greater potential for medium range (approximately of the order of few meters) NDT. This HOMC-GW phenomena occurs at very high frequency-thickness product. HOMC-GW have several attractive features for NDE applications. These are (i) tighter envelope that improves the temporal resolution (ii) shorter wavelength that improves the spatial resolution, (iii) The vanishing surface displacements of the out-of-plane component that is insensitive to surface loading, and (iv) sub-surface defect detectability. The HOMC technique has led to the development of TAPS – System for Tank Annular Plate Scanning and CUPS- Corrosion Under Pipe Support, and has successfully completed several field trials and demonstrated to detect and size hidden corrosion regions. These tools are currently available commercially for inspection of the critical regions in process industries though selected service providers. 
 

Biodata

Prof. Krishnan Balasubramaniam is currently the Dean for Industrial Consultancy and Sponsored Research at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. He also serves as a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and also serves as the Head of the Centre for Nondestructive Evaluation which he founded in 2001. His research focus is in the field of Non-destructive evaluation with applications in the fields of maintenance, quality assurance, manufacturing and design. 

He received his undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Madras (Regional Engineering College, Tiruchirapalli, India) in 1984. He then graduated from Drexel University with a M.S. degree in 1986 and a Ph.D. in the year 1989.  Before joining IIT Madras in 2000, he was employed at Mississippi State University.  He has over 400 technical publications (including 185 refereed journal papers), 14 patents filings and has directed 23 PHD student dissertations and 46 MS student theses. 

In recognition for his outstanding contributions to research in the field of Nondestructive Evaluation, he was conferred with the ROY SHARPE PRIZE by the British Institute for NDT for the year 2012. He was also awarded the ISTEM Entrepreneurial Faculty Member Award for his entrepreneurial activities by Auburn University, USA in 2011 and the NATIONAL NDT AWARD 2010 by the Indian Society for NDT. He has served as a Board Member of the World Federation of NDE Centers (WFNDEC– www.wfndec.org) that is headquartered in Iowa State University, USA.

He has actively pursued international collaborations in the field of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) with several universities including Michigan State University (USA),  Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University (USA), Iowa State University (USA), Imperial College (UK), University of Warwick (UK), Newcastle University (UK), Swinburne University (Australia), University of Bordeaux (France) BAM (Germany), and Fraunhoffer Institute of Nondestructive Testing (Germany). The student exchanges were support through joint funding from NSF (PIRE and IRES), Indo-US forum, IGSTC, CEFIPRA, and RCUK.

He has been instrumental in the incubation of several startups including Dhvani Research, Playns Technologies, Detect Technologies, Trotix Robotics, HyperVerge, and OP Tech and has jointly developed several new products through these companies.

He currently serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISNT) and as the South-east Asia Editor for the Journal of Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation (Taylor and Francis). He also serves as the Associate Editor of Ultrasonics (Elsevier) and serves in the editorial board of the Journal of Structural Longevity (Techscience). He also is a board member of the World Federation of NDE Centers and the QNDE Scientific Advisor Committee.  

He is a Life Fellow of the Academia NDT International, Life Fellow of the Indian Society of Nondestructive Testing (ISNT) and a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineers.

 

 



Prof. Jyotsna Dutta Majumdar

 

 

Prof. Jyotsna Dutta Majumdar

Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur

 

 

Symposia: Coatings & Linings - 4

 

 

September 20th 2016: 16:30 - 18:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: Studies on La2O3-YSZ Composite Thermal Barrier Coating on Inconel 718 Substrate

 

Abstract

In the present talk, a detailed study on composite thermal barrier coatings consisting of a mixture of La2O3 and YSZ (with varying La2O3 content from 8 mole% to 50 mole%) developed as top coating by plasma spray deposition technique on a CoNiCrAlY based bond coat deposited on Inconel 718 substrate by high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF) technique will be discussed. It is observed that addition of La2O3 in YSZ causes formation of pyrochlore (La2Zr2O7) phase in the inter splats boundaries along with the presence of LaYO3 phase. The coefficient of thermal expansion is reduced from 12.8 × 10-6/K (for YSZ) to a minimum of 10.2 × 10-6/K (for 32 mole% LaYSZ) due to evolution of different phases and structural defects in the coating. The activation energy for TGO growth under isothermal and cyclic oxidation is increased in the composite coating as compared to YSZ coating. The mechanism of the oxidation resistance enhancement is discussed in details. 

 

Biodata
Prof. Dutta Majumdar is serving for the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur as Professor. Her areas of research interests include corrosion and surface protection, laser materials processing, biomaterials, advanced materials developed by non-equilibrium processing routes and advanced welding of similar and dissimilar materials. She made fundamental contributions on development of coatings by laser and plasma processing routes for improved wear, corrosion and high temperature oxidation resistance applications, established understanding of the metallurgy of rapid solidification of metals under the specific heat input of a laser source. Her works also concern a detailed structure-property correlation of laser surface modified metallic materials with a specific goal to improve certain engineering properties. She also stated a brief understanding of the mechanism of wear, corrosion and high temperature oxidation of the metastable microstructures developed in commercial metals and alloys due to laser processing. Extensive efforts were also made for the first time for the development of compositionally graded surface and nano-dispersed surface for thermal barrier and hot corrosion application by application of hybrid coating technology. Graded and composite coatings with improved performance were developed as thermal barrier coatings and their mechanism of failure was established. Her recent research interests concern ultra-fast laser processing of materials, development of coatings for bio-implant applications, electron beam welding and laser aided 3-D manufacturing of objects.

 



Viswanath Mahadevan

 

 

Viswanath Mahadevan

Head of Development, BASF Construction Chemicals, Asia Pacific

 

Symposia: Reinforced Concrete - 2

 

 

September 21st 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – D

 

Topic: Solutions for the Protection and Mitigation of Corrosion in Concrete

 

Abstract
 

The use of steel to compensate for the tensile property limitations of concrete is almost as old as concrete itself. Steel is prone to corrosion, the impact varies depending on several factors including the purity and overall quality of steel. Corrosion is one of the major causes of the deterioration in durability of a concrete structure. As a result prediction, prevention and if necessary, mitigation of corrosion forms a core element of increasing the life of structures. Several technologies exist today for the prevention and mitigation of corrosion, some of which gets us close to achieving the end goal that keeps us awake - “is it possible to provide a guaranteed protection to a concrete structure against corrosion for a pre-determined time for a structure ?”.

In this discussion, we will explore the various key technologies available today for the prevention and mitigation of steel bearing concrete structures and explore the possibility of the ideal goal – achieving guaranteed protection of steel in concrete for a pre-determined time-frame.

 

 

Biodata
 

Viswanath Mahadevan is a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University. He worked at Cornell University, NY and Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company before joining BASF. He joined BASF Corporation, USA as a Scientist and went on to lead their R&D group in Cleveland, OH. During his tenure at BASF, he has developed several polycarboxylate superplasticizers and as led several new product admixture development projects for US and Canada.

He moved to India in 2012 as the Head of Technical, Construction Chemicals, BASF India Limited gaining experience with product development for several projects and applications in the areas of concrete, mortar, repair, grouts, waterproofing and underground construction.

Since 2015, he is in Shanghai as the Head of Development for BASF Construction Chemicals for Asia Pacific.

His areas of interest include superplasticizers, durability of concrete, and cement hydration. He has more than 10 years of direct experience in the construction industry.

 

 



Dr. I. Gurrappa

 

 

Dr. I. Gurrappa

Senior Scientist, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory

Hyderabad

 

Symposia: Corrosion in Defence Equipment & Facilities

 

September 21st 2016: 11:00 - 13:00, Hall – E

 

Topic: The Importance of Selecting a Suitable Titanium Based alloy for Marine Gas Turbine Engine Applications

 

Abstract

Excellent strength and lightweight properties made titanium based alloys attractive candidate materials to fabricate components for aerospace applications. The significantly improved strength is achieved by solid solution alloying and stabilization of two-phase structures. Although they exhibit good corrosion resistance due to the formation of titania on their surface, the nature, composition and thickness of the protective oxide scales depend on the environmental conditions as well as nature and concentration of alloying elements.  Due to the combined effects of elevated temperatures and exposure to harsh fuel and marine environmental conditions, hot corrosion has become a growing obstacle in meeting the desired efficiency of marine gas turbines. Therefore, it is essential to understand the corrosion characteristics of the titanium alloys in simulated marine gas turbine engine conditions and select a suitable material is a real challenge as the components have to function for a designed period at varied elevated temperatures. The talk covers the importance of selecting a suitable titanium alloy for marine gas turbine engine compressor section components based on extensive experimental data on different titanium based alloys under simulated marine engine environmental conditions. The talk also covers the degradation mechanisms due to which titanium alloys degrade in marine gas turbines. Based on the results, a suitable titanium alloy in association with appropriate hot corrosion resistant coatings is recommended to fabricate components intended to use for marine gas turbine engine applications, which not only would eliminate failures during service but also enhance their efficiency.

Biodata

Dr. Gurrappa has been working in the field of corrosion and its controlling technologies for the past three decades and playing a crucial role in defence. He has been working in a variety of fields like corrosion evaluation, monitoring, high temperature corrosion of titanium and superalloys, design and development of smart coatings for superalloys and titanium based alloys, nanostructured materials, nanocomposite coatings, biomaterials, weldments, steels, coatings development for biomaterials, magnetic materials, powder metallurgy components, aluminium alloys and selection of appropriate materials for missiles & armour vehicles, cathodic protection design & development, modeling of cathodic protection systems etc. In addition to defence systems, he has been helping different industries in solving the corrosion problems and stressing the need of prevention of corrosion by using different advanced protective techniques. Dr.Gurrappa has been recognised globally, received a number of Prestigious Fellowships and visited Germany, Japan, France, USA, UK, Belgium, Netherlands, Poland, Singapore, Israel and Malaysia. His list of numerous publications (two hundreds) both in international and national journals of repute provide sufficient support of his constant, successful and significant contributions in creating corrosion awareness and development of newer and novel protective systems and coatings to mitigate corrosion. He has received a number of best paper awards and delivered a number of invited lectures / talks, keynote addresses in various international / national symposia and chaired the technical sessions. Further, he was awarded a prestigious “ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT FELLOWSHIP” of Germany, MARIE CURIE INDIVIDUAL FELLOWSHIP OF EUROPEAN COMMISSION, JAPAN SOCIETY FOR PROMOTION OF SCIENCE INVITATION FELLOWSHIP of Japan, ROYAL SOCIETY OF CHEMISTRY FELLOWSHIP and ANDHRA PRADESH AKADEMI OF SCIECES FELLOWSHIP for recognition of his meritorious contributions in the field of corrosion and related technologies. He was also awarded prestigious “16th NIIS Corrosion awareness Award in the year 2010 and “10th NIIS Corrosion awareness Award in the year 2004 by NACE International India section for his MERITORIOUS CONTRIBUTIONS to the corrosion field. Further, he was invited to submit “reviews” for internationally leading materials journals and books/ book chapters by reputed publishers. He published 9 books/ book chapters and edited two books on Gas Turbines. He is an elected Fellow of Royal Society of chemistry, London and Andhra Pradesh Akademi of Sciences, India.

 



Prof. Amir Eliezer

 

 

Prof. Amir Eliezer
Dean, The Authority for Research & Development, Israel

 

Symposia: Materials and Composites  - 3

 

September 21st 2016: 14:00 - 15:30, Hall – B

 

Topic: Light metal Biomedical implants and coatings – How advanced and innovative are we? What is the correlation to applied corrosion science and education?

 

Abstract
 

Light metals are the major materials within the biomedical implant industry. Over the past few years, progresses in orthopedic surgery have helped to improve the quality of life. Approximately 4.5 million procedures related to joint replacement and fracture repair are performed worldwide each year. However, serious complications still occur mostly due to implant loosening or infection. Surface treatments and coatings have been major research axes to address those problems.

The major question is how innovative are we in comparison to other innovative industries such as smart phones computers and other technological fields. Additional issue is why is the orthopedic field is relative conservative and not as advanced for example as the computer industry even though human medical treatment and well-being is one of the most important parameter for our the human future. One of the major issues is to increase the awareness of practical corrosion methodology in order to understand the real time life time behavior of light metal implants under biological conditions.

The major question refers to the fact that up to date it is very difficult to find or define the correlation of corrosion behavior between the human body-scale to the laboratory scale. Another concern is should we consider the human body as an electrochemical cell or we can rely on an electrochemical software for developing biomedical applications.

The lecture will focus on the in-vitro-in-vivo and will present the importance of applied corrosion methods for biomaterials applications. The study will present a dedicated approach to identify and construct suitable traumatological implants made of magnesium as well as was undertaken and a suitable manufacturing process on an industrial scale was established. The results lead to the conclusion that in order to effectively tailor and control the biodegradation of titanium and magnesium implants, for example smart coatings and high tech corrosion approach are valuable to achieve  innovative  biomedical  devices.

 

Biodata
 

Prof. Amir Eliezer has studied  BSc ,MSc, PhD in Materials Engineering (Summa Cum Laude)  and an additional M.B.A.
 

He has received several awards and recognitions including the H.H. Uhlig 2013 award. He is a full Academic staff Member of two faculties Mechanical and Civil Engineering at SCE – Shamoon College of Engineering, Israel. He has published more than 200 scientific publications and received many academic - industrial international research grants.

 

Currently he holds the positions of  Dean, The Authority for Research & Development, Director, Corrosion Research Center, Nano-Bio & Advanced Materials and  Director, Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center at SCE. He is the President of the WCO and the Chair of NACE INTERNATIONAL European Area.

 



 












 
     
 
Recent Updates
 
Technical Program of CORCON has now been finalized. All the Authors are requested to submit the powerpoint files before 25 August 2015 and register for CORCON 2016 before 30 August. The Papers of those Authors who have not registered for CORCON before 30 August will not be included in the conference proceedings.

 
 
     
 

IMPORTANT FOR PRESENTING AUTHORS: The authors are required to upload their powerpoint file for approval to CORCON website. These approved presentation files would be made available in the presentation laptop. No presentation file would be taken from the author inside the presentation hall. For a backup, all the authors are also requested to bring the approved version of their powerpoint file on a pen drive to CORCON and check the availability of their presentation file at the time of registration.

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